President Trump is eager to claim credit for Apple’s moves, but it’s a bit more complicated.

THE TICKER

President Trump took a bold announcement by Apple on Wednesday and made an even bolder claim about it. 

The electronics giant touted a massive new investment in the U.S. economy, pledging to contribute $350 billion to it over the next five years, with $30 billion of that sum coming in the form of capital spending, including for a new campus. And the tech company said it will create 20,000 new jobs in the United States. The president seized on the news as validation of the Republican tax package:

The issue: It’s not clear how much the new tax regime contributed to Apple’s decision, if at all. 

In a 1,093-word statement detailing the move, the company noted it is handing the Treasury a $38 billion one-time payment. That meets a requirement under the new law that corporations pay previously deferred taxes on their foreign profits. The law set up that provision as a sort of compromise: Companies are being forced to fork over a portion of those overseas stashes to Uncle Sam, but they are being charged a deeply discounted rate (15.5 percent for cash and 8 percent for less liquid assets.) Apple says it is counting the $38 billion it’s paying toward the $350 billion total it advertised Wednesday.

The law gives companies the flexibility to spread what they owe under the levy over five years. But the payment is mandatory — and not, as Trump suggested in his tweet, itself a vote of confidence in the brightening business climate at home.

Beyond that, the company doesn’t chalk up anything else in its announcement to the tax law. The Wall Street Journal’s Tripp Mickle does a careful job parsing the company’s statement: 

The company previously said it planned $16 billion in capital expenditures world-wide in the fiscal year that ends this September, up from $14.9 billion the previous year. However, Apple doesn’t break out its spending in the U.S., making it difficult to gauge how much of the $30 billion over five years it announced Wednesday is new.

Toni Sacconaghi, an analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., said Apple’s plans are in line with Trump administration goals, but that it isn’t clear how much of the commitments are new. And he said the company could deliver on those commitments with existing cash flow — without needing to tap cash holdings.

“It’s a nice number and puts a foot forward in line with where the administration wants to go with adding jobs and building in the U.S.,” he said. But he added, “It’s not clear these investments were impacted in any way by tax reform.”

Separately, Bloomberg News’s Mark Gurman reported Wednesday, the company is awarding most of its employees worldwide a $2,500 bonus in stock grants in the months ahead. For that, beneficiaries can thank the tax cuts. 

But the announcement of Apple’s multibillion-dollar investments carried significantly more weight for Trump and other Republicans eager to find signs the tax package is supplying a big boost of momentum to broader economic growth. Another entrant in the parade of companies handing out bonuses may be nice. What the GOP would prefer, however, is evidence that corporate giants are plowing their windfalls into the kind of spending that will trickle down to workers. 

“Certainly higher wages and bonuses are good news,” Tax Foundation senior analyst Scott Greenberg says. “But if the tax bill is going to have a large economic effect, it’s likely going to take some time to show up, because will take some time for companies to respond to the incentives offered by the new tax provisions.” And, he cautioned, “it’s difficult to separate causality from companies looking for gestures of public goodwill.”

Apple isn’t likely to fact-check Trump’s claims.

The announcement appeared designed to win the company some good-citizen points, with Apple CEO Tim Cook declaring in a statement that his company “could only have happened in America, and we are proud to build on our long history of support for the US economy.”

Recall that the tech titan came in for special abuse from Trump during the 2016 campaign. The candidate promised to make Apple “start building their damn computers and things in this country instead of in other countries,” at one point urged a boycott of Apple products, and said he would “come down so hard” on Cook that “his head would be spinning all of the way back to Silicon Valley.”

But Apple isn’t the only corporate giant that has been coy about pledging to use its tax gains for investments and wage hikes rather than, say, stock buybacks and dividend payments.

A CNBC survey of the 100 biggest companies by market cap found only nine with “specific plans to use some of the money saved from the corporate tax cuts to boost worker pay or invest in facilities or charitable causes.”

In other news, the sun rose today. Can we say for sure it would have but for the corporate tax cut?

MARKET MOVERS

— DOW 26,000. CNBC’s Fred Imbert: “Stocks traded higher on Wednesday following the release of stronger-than-expected quarterly results from some of the biggest U.S. companies. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 322.79 points, closing above 26,000 for the first time. The index first broke above the milestone mark on Tuesday. The S&P 500 gained 0.9 percent to finish at 2,802.56, with staples and tech rising more than 1 percent. The index also posted a record close.Tech stocks got a boost from Apple, which erased losses after announcing plans to repatriate billions in overseas cash. The stock closed 1.7 percent higher. The Nasdaq composite rose 1 percent to finish at 7,298.28, a record.”

It broke the record in record time. CNN Money’s Matt Egan: “The latest rush to buy stocks left the average up almost 8,000 points since… Trump’s 2016 election.The rally on Wednesday gave the Dow its best percentage gain since November. And it showed that the upward trend remains intact despite a big reversal the day before… But the velocity of the rally is raising eyebrows. It took just seven trading days for the Dow to climb from 25,000 to 26,000. While that is just a 4% advance, it’s part of a broader surge that has carried the Dow 42% during the Trump era. And the market rise has come with virtually no breaks.”

U.S. Industrial Production Rose 0.9% in December

U.S. industrial production rose sharply in December, boosted by gains in utilities output as cold weather swept across the nation and increased demand for heating.

WSJ

MONEY ON THE HILL

Shutdown showdown. The Post’s Mike DeBonis, Ed O’Keefe, and Erica Werner: “Bitter divisions in both parties threatened Wednesday to derail Congress’s effort to keep the federal government fully operating past the end of the week. The shutdown threat emerged on two fronts: Republican defense hawks in the House said a short-term spending plan the party introduced late Tuesday did not devote enough money to the military. Meanwhile, Democrats, whose support would be critical for passage in the Senate, began lining up in opposition amid pressure from immigration activists to use the budget talks as leverage to legalize many young immigrants known as ‘dreamers.’ By Wednesday evening, the short-term bill was on the cusp of failure…

House Republicans unveiled a bill Tuesday that would extend funding for four weeks, allowing time for further negotiations toward deals on long-term spending and immigration. To entice Democrats, GOP leaders attached a six-year extension of the popular Children’s Health Insurance Program, as well as the delay of two unpopular health-care taxes. But few, if any, Democrats have been swayed by the overture.”

Tax bill fails to crack majority. Politico’s Toby Eckert: “Support for the Republican tax plan has ticked up slightly since [Trump] signed it into law, but it still hasn’t drawn the backing of a majority of voters, according to a new POLITICO/Morning Consult poll.

The GOP’s top selling point for the plan recently — a spate of employee bonuses and wage increases — was a wash in the poll. The tracking poll, conducted Jan. 11-16, found that a 45 percent plurality of voters backed the plan based on what they knew about it, up from 42 percent in a similar poll before the legislation was enacted on Dec. 22. Opposition in the new poll came in at 34 percent, down from 39 percent. Twenty percent of respondents were undecided, up from 18 percent. After respondents were told about the major provisions of the bill, support rose to 47 percent, opposition remained at 34 percent.”

ICI reverses itself on fund rules. Politico’s Zachary Warmbrodt: “A prominent investment industry group is lobbying to keep in place major money market mutual fund regulations that it resisted only a few years ago. The issue will come to a head this week as the House Financial Services Committee votes on bipartisan legislation that would roll back regulations intended to prevent the kind of investor runs on money market funds that exacerbated the 2008 financial crisis. The Investment Company Institute, which represents money managers, did not support many of the safeguards the SEC enacted in 2014 but told senior lawmakers in a letter Friday that it now opposes the House bill that would defang the rules.”

GOP Senator to Block Two Trump Nominees Over Trade Concerns

A GOP senator with concerns about President Trump’s trade policy said Wednesday he would block two of the president’s nominees, saying the Trump administration hasn’t been responsive to his concerns on the issue.

WSJ

TRUMP TRACKER

Trump threatens NAFTA. Reuters’s Jeff Mason and David Lawder: “Trump on Wednesday said that terminating the North American Free Trade Agreement would result in the ‘best deal’ to revamp the 24-year-old trade pact with Canada and Mexico in favor of U.S. interests. Lawmakers as well as agricultural and industrial groups have warned Trump not to quit NAFTA, but he said that may be the outcome.

‘We’re renegotiating NAFTA now. We’ll see what happens. I may terminate NAFTA,’ Trump said in an interview with Reuters. ‘A lot of people are going to be unhappy if I terminate NAFTA. A lot of people don’t realize how good it would be to terminate NAFTA because the way you’re going to make the best deal is to terminate NAFTA. But people would like to see me not do that,’ he said. Trump’s comments come less than a week before trade negotiators from the United States, Canada and Mexico meet in Montreal for the sixth of seven scheduled rounds of negotiations to update NAFTA.”

Considers big “fine” against China. More from Reuters: “Trump and his economic adviser Gary Cohn said China had forced U.S. companies to transfer their intellectual property to China as a cost of doing business there. The United States has started a trade investigation into the issue, and Cohn said the United States Trade Representative would be making recommendations about it soon. ‘We have a very big intellectual property potential fine going, which is going to come out soon,’ Trump said in the interview. While Trump did not specify what he meant by a ‘fine’ against China, the 1974 trade law that authorized an investigation into China’s alleged theft of U.S. intellectual property allows him to impose retaliatory tariffs on Chinese goods or other trade sanctions until China changes its policies.”

Fed overhaul hits snags. The Post’s Heather Long: “In less than three weeks, the Federal Reserve, which is widely credited with playing a major role in leading the United States out of the Great Recession, will be under new leadership. Current Fed chair Janet L. Yellen is leaving, and Jerome Powell is President Trump’s nominee to take her place. But Trump’s efforts to remake the Federal Reserve will soon face key tests. The first hurdle will be the Senate. All of Trump’s appointees to the Fed require Senate approval, which has been slow in coming. Trump nominated Powell on Nov. 2, but the Senate didn’t act on his appointment before the end of the year, forcing the president to renominate Powell in 2018… Trump has made his priorities clear for a Powell-led Fed: He wants the stock market to keep soaring and the economy to grow faster. To make that happen, Trump would like interest rates to stay low and fewer restrictions on Wall Street banks. But Powell has been clear to stress the Fed’s independence — from Congress and the White House — in public appearances since his nomination.”

Powell says he’ll hold Deutsche Banke accountable. Bloomberg’s Jesse Hamilton: “Donald Trump’s pick to run the Federal Reserve, responding to a key lawmaker’s concerns over the president’s ties to Deutsche Bank AG, said the agency will hold the German lender to the same standards as the rest of the industry. Fed Governor Jerome Powell answered a letter from Senate Banking Committee member Chris Van Hollen ahead of the panel’s vote on his nomination to become chairman, telling the Maryland Democrat that he’s committed to supervising banks “in an independent manner.” Powell’s nomination was advanced by the committee on Wednesday, with Van Hollen voting in favor.”

Replacing Dudley. Reuters’s Jonathan Spicer: “Unions and groups advocating for retirees, teachers, housing, and workers’ benefits are among those visiting the ornate conference rooms of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to lobby for a less conventional candidate to serve as its next president. New York Fed directors leading the search for a successor to chief William Dudley, seen as the second most influential policymaker at the U.S. central bank, invited the guests to last week’s meeting to seek their advice. According to attendees and others familiar with the search, the directors are close to a “long list” of candidates and appear set to begin formal interviews within weeks. Until then, directors Sara Horowitz and Glenn Hutchins are taking steps intended to head off any criticisms of opacity and lack of diversity that, in recent years, have stung presidential searches at other district Fed banks. The afternoon meeting with 11 advocacy groups last week marked what one attendee called an unprecedented gesture of public outreach.”

RUSSIA WATCH: 

Bannon agrees to Mueller interview. The Post’s Roz Helderman and Karoun Demirjian: “Former top White House adviser and Trump campaign strategist Stephen K. Bannon has agreed to an interview for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia investigation likely to take place later this month, but his lawyer is pushing back against House investigators’ demands for an audience Thursday afternoon, arguing there is ‘no conceivable way’ Bannon will be ready for an interview on the panel’s terms. House Intelligence Committee members K. Michael Conaway (R-Tex.), who is leading the Russia investigation, and Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), the panel’s ranking member, sent a letter Wednesday to Bannon’s lawyer, William Burck, insisting that Bannon return to Capitol Hill on Thursday at 2 p.m. to comply with a subpoena they issued Tuesday after Bannon refused to answer questions, citing orders from the White House.”

Probe could collide with midterms. Politico’s Darren Sameulsohn: “Robert Mueller’s Russia probe isn’t ending any time soon, and that’s bad news for President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans already bracing for a possible 2018 Democratic midterm wave. While many Republicans insist the Trump-Russia saga is overblown, they worry headlines about federal indictments, high profile trials—and a potential blockbuster meeting between Mueller and Trump himself—could obscure their positive message ahead of November elections and threaten their House and Senate majorities. In an ominous development for Republicans, a federal judge overseeing the upcoming trial of former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his deputy Rick Gates rejected Mueller’s request to begin in May and instead outlined a scheduled start as soon as September or October — peak election season.”

Wonkblog

Eric Trump’s 401(k) is up by 35 percent, but half of American families don’t even have one

“I didn’t think retirement was possible, and now it is,” he told Hannity.

Christopher Ingraham

POCKET CHANGE

Goldman’s losing money. NYT’s Emily Flitter: “Goldman Sachs used to seem invincible. In the fourth quarter, it lost money. The Wall Street firm on Wednesday reported its first quarterly loss since 2011. It was the result of a one-time $4.4 billion charge stemming from the new tax law. But even ignoring that unusual event, Goldman’s weak core results showed how far the firm has fallen. The bank’s per-share earnings and revenue were both higher compared with a year earlier without the tax charge. But the results announced on Wednesday also revealed a decline in Goldman’s trading might, which has been drained by a potent combination of placid markets and quiet clients. Revenue in its business of buying and selling bonds, commodities and currencies — historically an engine of Goldman’s results — sank to $1 billion in the fourth quarter, half of what it was during the same period in 2016. For the year, net revenue in that business fell 30 percent. The drop sent Goldman’s shares down 3 percent on Wednesday.”

CRYPTO BITS: 

Treasury sees a threat. Bloomberg’s Saleha Mohsin: “The U.S. Treasury views virtual currencies such as Bitcoin as an “evolving threat” and is examining dealers to make sure they aren’t being used to finance illegal activities, the undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence said. Treasury is working with the Internal Revenue Service examiners to review 100 registered digital currency providers as well as others that have not registered, Sigal Mandelker said in prepared testimony to the Senate Banking Committee on Wednesday. The department is also working with the Justice Department to pursue money laundering cases.”

Bitcoin falls below $10,000. CNN Money’s Nathaniel Meyersohn: “Bitcoin keeps tumbling. The price of the volatile digital currency briefly dipped below $10,000 around 7 a.m. ET on Wednesday, its lowest level since late November, according to data from CoinDesk.com. Bitcoin has dropped nearly 30% this week and has lost almost half of its $19,343 peak value on December 16. Bitcoin approached its record as it launched on futures exchanges in the United States. But it has since fallen sharply. Other popular cryptocurrencies ethereum and ripple also have posted double-digit losses. One virtual currency exchange, Bitconnect, dived 93% late Monday. It’s unclear why bitcoin has had a rough week. Cryptocurrency is a murky market with frequent swings.”

Ripple founder loses $44 billion. CNBC’s Evelyn Cheng: “The digital currency plunge has wiped billions from the paper fortune of a cryptocurrency billionaire in just a few weeks. Ripple’s XRP coin has fallen 74 percent from an all-time high of $3.84 hit on Jan. 4, erasing $44 billion from the holdings of Chris Larsen, co-founder and executive chairman of Ripple. With XRP trading near $1 Wednesday, Larsen now holds the equivalent of just $15.8 billion, according to CNBC calculations using figures from Forbes. Citing sources at Ripple, Forbes said earlier this month that Larsen has 5.19 billion of XRP and a 17 percent stake in the start-up. Ripple holds 61.3 billion of the 100 billion XRP coins in existence. At XRP’s peak on Jan. 4, Larsen was worth $59.9 billion. That made him one of the five richest people in the U.S. and wealthier than Google’s founders, based on Forbes’ rich list.”

Stock market endangered? CNBC’s Stephanie Landsman: “A sustained sell-off in the cryptocurrency market will hit the stock market where it hurts, one major Wall Street firm warns. It’s a scenario investors are underestimating, according to Wells Fargo Securities’ Christopher Harvey. ‘We see a lot of froth in that market. If and when it comes out, it will spill over to equities,’ the firm’s head of equity strategy said Tuesday… ‘I don’t think people are really ready for that.'”

Goldman’s No. 2 Allegedly Swindled Out of $1.2 Million of Wine by Assistant

A former personal assistant to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Co-President David Solomon faces federal charges that he stole more than $1.2 million of rare wine from his boss.

Bloomberg

BlackRock Lets Its Hair Down by Offering Unlimited Time Off

BlackRock Inc., taking a page from Silicon Valley where ping-pong tables and on-site gyms are common perks, is offering unlimited time off.

Bloomberg

THE REGULATORS

Fannie, Freddie regulator: Take them private. Bloomberg’s Joe Light: “Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s regulator is throwing its voice into the debate about what to do with the two companies at the center of the U.S. mortgage system. In a proposal obtained by Bloomberg News, Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Mel Watt wrote that he and agency staff believe the mortgage market should be supported by shareholder-owned utilities with regulated rates of return and an explicit government guarantee of mortgage bonds. Watt sent the document, titled ‘Federal Housing Finance Agency Perspectives on Housing Finance Reform’ along with a letter dated Tuesday to Senate Banking Chairman Michael Crapo, an Idaho Republican, and Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio, the panel’s top Democrat. By sharing the perspectives now, ‘we seek to provide our views independently and transparently to those who have requested them while continuing to provide technical assistance to the committee and its members on other proposals that may be introduced,’ Watt wrote.”

Mulvaney moves to overhaul CFPB. LA Times’s Jim Puzzanghera: “On Wednesday, Mulvaney announced he was launching a review of the entire operation of the consumer watchdog agency created in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. The bureau has provided Americans with billions of dollars in refunds and debt relief, often at banks’ expense. Republicans and many financial firms have complained that it has been too aggressive… The bureau said it would formally request public input about whether it is ‘fulfilling its proper and appropriate functions to best protect consumers.’ It will seek comment on its enforcement of consumer protection laws, drafting of regulations, oversight of financial firms, monitoring of the marketplace and public education. The first function to be examined: how the bureau demands information from financial firms during investigations.”

Asks financial firms for complaints. The Hill’s Sylvan Lane: The CFPB “is asking the firms its regulates to submit complaints about the agency’s core actions. The CFPB announced Wednesday that the agency will ask ‘for evidence to ensure the bureau is fulfilling its proper and appropriate functions to best protect consumers.’ The request is the latest step forward in acting Director Mick Mulvaney’s effort to draw back the bureau’s aggressive regulatory and enforcement actions. Mulvaney said in a Wednesday statement that it’s ‘natural for the Bureau to critically examine its policies and practices to ensure they align with the Bureau’s statutory mandate.'”

Cordray blasts. More from The Hill: “The former director of the… CFPB blasted his successor in a series of tweets Wednesday for attempting to unwind the agency’s rule on payday lending. Richard Cordray, the bureau’s first director, panned the CFPB’s plans as ‘truly shameful action by the interim pseudo-leaders’ of the bureau.” … ‘Let’s see the case be made, with full debate, on whether the zealots and toadies can justify repealing a rule to protect consumers against extortionate payday loans,’ Cordray continued.”

Hoenig criticizes banking bill. Reuters’s Pete Schroeder: “A top official at a leading U.S. bank regulator is airing concerns about a Senate bill that would ease banking rules, saying parts of it could “significantly weaken” critical protections. Thomas Hoenig, the vice chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, warned lawmakers that efforts to ease new rules around leverage and proprietary trading could encourage banks to take on excessive amounts of risk, and put the stability of the financial system at risk. Hoenig said he was broadly supportive of the bill primarily aimed at easing rules for smaller banks, crafted by Republicans and moderate Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee, but has concerns about a pair of key sections. In particular, Hoenig warned Congress’s attempts to relax burdens around the Volcker Rule and the supplementary leverage ratio would do more harm than good.”

SCOTUS considers overtime rule. Washington Examiner’s Sean Higgins: “Looking under the hood and figuring out what is wrong is a popular cliche, but on Wednesday, the Supreme Court examined whether the workers who actually do that should be guaranteed overtime pay. The justices heard oral arguments in Encino Motorcars v. Navarro, a case involving whether the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime rules extend to “service advisers” at auto dealerships. It is the second time it has heard the case. Service advisers are the dealership employees who tell customers what repairs or other work their cars need. Congress exempted them from the overtime regulation in 1966, but in 2011, the Obama administration changed the rule and said service advisers should be able to claim overtime pay.”

New late trading method gets SEC ok. Bloomberg’s Annie Massa: “Cboe Global Markets Inc. got regulators’ permission to challenge its chief rivals in U.S. equities, the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market, during their crucial end-of-day auctions. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will let the company begin Cboe Market Close, which the company says is a lower-cost way to carry out certain closing trades that may otherwise be completed at markets owned by NYSE Group and Nasdaq Inc. NYSE and Nasdaq had argued against approval, saying Cboe’s offering could tarnish the critical role played by auctions that set closing levels for thousands of U.S. stocks. NYSE and Nasdaq both stand to lose volume from any mechanism threatening their closing auctions. Cboe countered that their concerns were overblown, since some brokers already provide a similar function for customers. The SEC came down in favor of Cboe, according to a filing Wednesday.”

CHART TOPPER

From Axios’s Chris Canipe and Steve LeVine: “Manufacturing jobs are up sharply from the recession:”

DAYBOOK

Today

  • The American Enterprise Institute holds an event on “New thinking about poverty and economic mobility.”
  • The Cato Institute Policy Perspectives 2018 hosts a discussion on “A Fiscal Rule to Tame Federal Debt?”

Coming Up

  • The SEC-NYU Dialogue on Securities Markets – Shareholder Engagement will be held in New York on Friday. 

THE FUNNIES

From The Post’s Tom Toles: 

BULL SESSION

Sen. Lindsey Graham tells lawmakers: “Stop the s-show and grow up:” 

Here’s an ongoing list of White House staff, Cabinet members, and federal appointees who quit or were fired under Trump:

Here’s how tech companies are using algorithms to prevent extremist content:

Stephen Colbert talks about how “Fire and Fury” author Michael Wolff got access to the White House: 

Apple states it’ll pay $38bn in foreign cash taxes and make 20,000 US jobs

  • Tech giant states it’ll repatriate some overseas cash holdings
  • Apple has faced sustained critique for tax evasion policies

Apple chief executive Tim Cook said: ‘We have a deep sense of responsibility to give back to our country.’ Apple leader Tim Prepare stated: ‘We possess a deep feeling of responsibility to provide to our country.’ Photograph: John Forces/APApple stated on Wednesday it might create a one-time payment of $38bn to repatriate a number of its vast overseas cash holdings.

the Wall Street Journal that Apple’s ceo, Tim Prepare, had guaranteed to construct three “big, big, big” plants in america included in attorney at law about tax reform.

The organization may be the latest to announce a 1-off payment because of recent changes to all of us tax law, which enables companies to pay for a levy of 15.5% on overseas cash holdings which are repatriated towards the US.

Commenting around the company’s plans, Prepare stated: “We possess a deep feeling of responsibility to provide to our country and those who help to make our success possible.”

Apple hasn’t specified the amount of its cash pile it promises to repatriate.

In 2013, a Senate committee accused Apple of utilizing a “highly questionable” web of offshore vehicles to prevent having to pay taxes in america. Senator John McCain stated his constituents were “mad as hell” to understand the world’s greatest company was having to pay tax rates which were sometimes less than 1%.

“I’ve never witnessed anything such as this,” he stated.

Based on the Paradise Papers, a leak of 13.4m files from offshore providers and tax havens’ company registries printed through the Protector along with other worldwide media, within the wake of america and EU’s criticisms Apple secretly shifted areas of its empire to Jersey included in an intricate rearrangement to help keep its low tax rates.

In December, the Irish government was made to start collecting $15bn the Eu states Apple has unfairly prevented in taxes. Apple is fighting the choice.

Apple’s Tim Prepare compensated $102m this season including bonuses worth $98m

Apple’s leader, Tim Prepare, was compensated $102m (£76m) this season after collecting an enormous share bonus from the iPhone maker’s stock exchange performance.

Prepare was compensated a fundamental earnings of $3.06m, a money bonus of $9.3m (up from $5.4m this past year), and picked up share awards worth $89m taking his total 2017 payout to $102m, Apple disclosed inside a regulatory filing.

The power of 560,000 shares compensated in September. Prepare received half the award because Apple’s stock delivered shareholder returns within the top third from the Standard & Poor’s 500 index in the past 3 years. She got another 280,000 shares for simply remaining within the job.

The stock package awarded to Prepare as he grew to become leader this year was initially worth $376m, but has become worth a lot more because Apple shares have elevated six-fold since he signed the offer.

As lengthy because he continues to be the boss, Prepare will get 560,000 shares of stock yearly until 2020. He’ll then get 1.26m shares in August 2021 because the final payment under his original contract.

Apple’s filing also revealed required Prepare to visit by private aircraft “for all personal and business travel” for security reasons. Cook’s utilisation of the private jet for his holidays cost the organization $93,000. The price of his personal security detail was $224,000.

Prepare collected an additional $104,000 in “vacation cash out”, and the fundamental $3m salary was elevated to $3,057,692 “because 2017 would be a 53-week fiscal year, the 2017 salary amounts reflect an additional week of pay”. That extra week’s pay is a little more compared to median US annual household earnings of $56,516, based on the US Census.

Cook’s top 5 lieutenants were compensated about $24.2m each. Luca Maestri, chief financial officer Angela Ahrendts, mind of retail Johny Srouji, mind of hardware technology Dan Riccio, mind of hardware engineering and Bruce Sewell, the outgoing general counsel, collected $20m in share awards, cash bonuses of $3.1m and fundamental pay of approximately $1m.

The quantity compensated to Jony Ive, their British chief design officer, wasn’t incorporated within the filing.

Apple’s shares have elevated by greater than 200% since Prepare grew to become leader in August 2011, shortly before founder and former leader Jobs died.

The shares peaked at $176.4 on 18 December but have since weakened slightly to $170.60 following reports of less strong than expected interest in its new $999 iPhone X.

Apple secretly moved areas of empire to Jersey after row over tax matters

Apple reacted to prevalent critique of their tax matters by secretly shifting key areas of its empire to Jersey included in an intricate rearrangement which has permitted it to help keep an ultra-low tax rate, based on an analysis of Paradise Papers documents.

The move affected a couple of its most significant subsidiaries, such as considered to contain the answer to a business cash pile more vital than $250bn (£190bn).

In the last 3 years, Apple has reported having to pay really low tax rates on its profits outdoors the united states – not even more than formerly. However this remains considerably less than virtually all of the markets where its phones, iPads and personal computers are offered – and under half the speed in Ireland, where the organization has numerous of their subsidiaries.

Though Apple has been doing nothing illegal, the disclosure will probably raise fresh questions for that technology company, that has been made to defend its tax matters. This may also prompt awkward questions regarding the character from the new tax rules created by the Irish government as well as their timing.

Apple declined to reply to detailed questions, but defended the brand new plans and stated they’d not decreased their tax payment all over the world.

“The debate over Apple’s taxes isn’t about how exactly much we owe but where we owe it. We’ve compensated over $35bn in corporate earnings taxes in the last 3 years, plus vast amounts of dollars more in property tax, payroll tax, florida sales tax and VAT,” it stated.

“We believe every company includes a responsibility to pay for the required taxes they owe and we’re happy with the economical contributions we make towards the countries and communities where we all do business.”

Edward Kleinbard, an old corporate lawyer who’s a professor of tax law in the College of Los Angeles, told the Worldwide Consortium of Investigative Journalists: “US multinational firms would be the global grandmasters of tax avoidance schemes that deplete not only US tax collection, however the tax assortment of nearly every large economy on the planet.Inches

Tim Cook announcing the new iPhone 7 in 2016. Tim Prepare announcing the brand new iPhone 7 in 2016. Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Documents within the Paradise Papers show how Apple started to think about its options in 2014 following critique of how it had been conducting business through Ireland. Last year, a bipartisan US Senate committee had pilloried the organization for seeking “the ultimate goal of tax avoidance”. It highlighted practices which had saved Apple from having to pay vast amounts of dollars over decades.

printed in May 2013 described how Apple had incorporated certainly one of its primary subsidiaries, Apple Operations Worldwide (AOI), in Ireland in 1980. However the subsidiary had “no employees with no physical presence [in Ireland] … and holds its board conferences in California”.

Senators highlighted two other Apple subsidiaries in Ireland, Apple Sales Worldwide (ASI) and Apple Operations Europe (AOE), that have been and in effect “stateless”. The size from the tax avoidance was huge, the senators stated. They described Apple’s plans as “a gimmick”.

Senators were so infuriated through the plans they accused Apple of exploiting the space backward and forward nations’ tax laws and regulations and developing a “byzantine tax structure” which was inexcusable. Among the report’s authors, the Democratic senator Carl Levin, stated Apple had “created offshore entities holding many vast amounts of dollars while claiming to become tax resident nowhere”.

The Republican senator John McCain stated: “Apple claims is the largest US corporate citizen, but by sheer size and scale it’s also among America’s largest tax avoiders … [It] shouldn’t be shifting its profits overseas to prevent the payment people tax, purposefully depriving the United states citizens of revenue.”

Senator John McCain Senator John McCain. Photograph: Aaron P Bernstein/Reuters

Within the several weeks that adopted the publication from the report, along with the European commission also beginning to scrutinise Apple’s tax plans, Ireland received pressure to alter its tax rules and new proposals were announced in October 2013.

The Irish government stated companies incorporated in Ireland, for example Apple’s subsidiaries, could avoid owing corporation tax only when they might show these were being “managed and controlled in another jurisdiction” where they’d be responsible for tax.

The announcement left Apple having a stark choice. It either needed to acknowledge the subsidiaries appeared to be run in the US, meaning they would need to pay American taxes. Or it’d to locate a new jurisdiction for that subsidiaries, preferably one with little if any corporation tax – for example Jersey.

The documents within the Paradise Papers show Apple was positively searching for any new house because of its key subsidiaries at the begining of 2014. The organization had contacted Appleby through its US lawyers, who requested Appleby’s offices in various offshore jurisdictions to complete a questionnaire that will highlight the benefits to Apple of moving there.

Inside a letter in the lawyers on 20 March 2014, Appleby was requested “to provide help with and coordination of the multijurisdictional project relating to the British Virgin Islands (BVI), Cayman, Guernsey, Isle of individual and Jersey … In case your proposal is cost-effective only then do we will request you to handle the whole project.”

60-eight minutes later, a senior Appleby executive sent an e-mail with other partners expressing excitement that Apple had made the approach and inspiring a quick and positive response.

“This is really a tremendous chance for all of us to shine on the global basis … Please would you think about the questionnaire and supply your very best fee proposal for … your jurisdiction. I … would ask that you simply embrace this chance to construct a more in-depth relationship using their esteemed client,” the e-mail stated.

The manager noted that discretion was important: “Finally, for individuals individuals who aren’t aware, Apple are very sensitive concerning publicity and don’t generally permit their exterior counsel to reveal they have been engaged by Apple in order to make any mention (not really generically) in marketing materials towards the relevant engagement.”

Four days later, Appleby partners exchanged further emails that they spoke of getting impressed Apple’s lawyers, who’d added Bermuda to the listing of potential new jurisdictions – another territory where Appleby were built with a base.

Someone in Appleby’s Isle of individual office told colleagues: “We have attempted to create our solutions as attractive as you possibly can considering that we’d be delighted to utilize Apple.”

The necessity to secure a brand new home for Apple’s subsidiaries grew to become urgent later in October 2014, once the Irish government designed a further announcement. Delivering his budget statement, the then Irish finance minister Michael Noonan stated Dublin was tightening the guidelines even more and would prevent firms that are incorporated in Ireland being managed and run in tax havens.

That may have jeopardised Apple’s plans for moving its subsidiaries to Jersey however for an essential caveat.

Michael Noonan, the former Irish finance minister Michael Noonan, the previous Irish finance minister. Photograph: Bloomberg/Getty Images

Noonan stated any companies incorporated in Ireland prior to the finish of 2014 which were being run from tax havens could continue these plans until 31 December 2020 – a six-year duration of elegance referred to as “the grandfathering provisions”. This gave Apple two several weeks to finalise moving to Jersey, a crown dependency from the United kingdom, making its very own laws and regulations and isn’t susceptible to most EU legislation, which makes it a well known tax haven.

The Paradise Papers show a couple of Apple’s Irish subsidiaries, AOI and ASI, while altering tax residency to Jersey.

Apple declined to go over the facts. However the Protector understands ASI has become an inactive company.

Apple declined to state in which the valuable economic legal rights once of ASI have been gone to live in but it’s understood its Irish operations are actually tell you companies tax resident in Ireland.

One theory is the fact that AOE “bought” the legal rights of ASI benefiting from a motivation known as capital allowance. Which means that if your multinational buys its very own ip with an Irish subsidiary, the price of that purchase will generate years of tax write-offs in Ireland. Some experts have recommended multinationals switching ip to eire could achieve tax rates as little as 2.5%.

Apple declined to discuss this, but stated: “The changes we made didn’t reduce our tax payments in almost any country. Actually, our payments to eire elevated considerably … (in 2014/15/16) we’ve compensated $1.5bn in tax there – 7% of corporate earnings taxes compensated for the reason that country.”

But Apple will not say how much cash it can make through its Irish companies, which makes it hard to assess the value of the sum.

Apple’s fiscal reports indicate it has ongoing to savor a minimal tax rate on its worldwide operations. The firm made $122bn in profits outdoors the united states in that same three-year period, which it had been taxed $6.6bn – an interest rate of 5.4%.

Apple stated: “Under the present worldwide tax system, earnings are taxed according to in which the value is produced. The required taxes Apple is effective regions derive from that principle. Most the worth within our products is indisputably produced within the U . s . States, where we all do our design, development, engineering work plus much more, so nearly all our taxes are owed towards the US.

“When Ireland altered its tax laws and regulations in 2015, we complied by altering the residency in our Irish subsidiaries so we informed Ireland, the ecu commission and also the U . s . States. The alterations we made didn’t reduce our tax payments in almost any country. An Apple logo on hoarding boards outside the company’s campus in Cork, Ireland. An Apple emblem on hoarding boards outdoors their campus in Cork, Ireland. Photograph: Bloomberg via Getty Images

It “We realize that some want to alter the tax system so multinationals’ taxes are dispersed differently over the countries where they operate, so we realize that reasonable people might have different views about how exactly this will work later on.

At Apple, we stick to the laws and regulations, and when the machine changes we’ll comply. We strongly support efforts in the global community toward comprehensive worldwide tax reform along with a far simpler system, and we’ll still advocate for your.Inches

The organization has frequently defended its tax matters through the years. Its leader, Tim Prepare, told the united states Senate committee that Apple compensated all of the taxes it owed and complied with “the laws and regulations and also the spirit from the laws”.

The organization has additionally condemned attempts through the European commission to have it to pay for an archive $14.5bn in delinquent taxes.

“The finding is wrongheaded,” Prepare told the Irish broadcaster RTÉ. “It’s not the case. There wasn’t a unique deal between Ireland and Apple. When you are charged with doing something which is really foreign for your values, it brings about outrage in your soul.Inches

Apple, Facebook and Microsoft lead fightback against Trump over Daca

Major US technology firms, including Apple, Microsoft and Facebook, are arranging to fight Trump’s government because of its decision to finish a programme protecting almost millions of youthful migrants from deportation / removal.

Microsoft has guaranteed to visit court to protect any worker who faces deportation / removal when the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals programme leads to six months’ time. When the government attempts to deport a Microsoft worker, their president, Kaira Cruz, stated: “It’s going to need to undergo us to obtain that individual.Inches

Cruz later clarified what which will mean used: “If Congress does not act, our organization will exercise its legal legal rights correctly to assist safeguard our employees. When the government seeks to deport one, we’ll provide and purchase their a lawyer. We’ll also file an amicus brief and explore whether we are able to directly intervene in almost any such situation.”

Apple’s leader, Tim Prepare, tweeted support for individuals facing an uncertain future, stating that “Apple will fight to allow them to be treated as equals.” Within an internal email, acquired through the Protector, Prepare went further, calling the move a “setback for the nation”. Greater than 250 Apple workers are paid by the programme, he stated, and most of them happen to be conntacting their leadership requesting action to assist the so-known as Dreamers.

“I’ve received several notes over the past weekend from Dreamers within Apple,” Prepare authored to employees. “Some explained they found the united states as youthful as 2 yrs old, while some recounted it normally won’t even remember a period they weren’t within this country.”

Prepare authored: “I wish to guarantee that Apple works with people of Congress from both sides to advocate for any legislative solution that gives permanent protections for the Dreamers within our country. We’re also working carefully with all of our co-workers to supply them as well as their families the support they require, such as the advice of immigration experts.”

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg was similarly blunt, calling this news “a sad day for the country.”

“The decision to finish Daca isn’t just wrong,” he authored. “It is especially cruel to provide youthful people the American dream, encourage them to leave the shadows and trust our government, after which punish them for this.Inches

Zuckerberg encouraged Facebook users to their people of Congress and campaign for legislation that will give individuals impacted by the choice a way to citizenship.