We want to create a French Mittelstand, says Macron’s right hand man 

Emmanuel Macron’s planned economic reforms should kick-start the creation of millions of jobs and help build a business powerhouse in France to rival Germany’s famed Mittelstand, according to a close ally of the French President.

Chopping back red tape and making it easier for small companies to grow and hire staff should provide a major boost to the economy over the next 12 to 18 months, Benjamin Griveaux said on a trip to London.

“We have the small companies and we have big companies, and in between are the mid-sized firms with more than 250 workers and more than €50m turnover. We have 4,000 companies like this in France,” said the minister of state, noting that regulations intensify when small companies grow to reach this scale.

Emmanuel Macron, left, wants to boost the French economy by reforming the jobs market, which Mr Griveaux hopes will bring the number of strong mid-sized firms closer to the level in Germany Credit: Stephane Mahe/REUTERS

“Germany has 12,000, Great Britain has between 8,000 and 9,000, the same in Italy. There is no reason why France cannot reach that level.

“This is very important because this is where the jobs of tomorrow are, this is where you can have a good exportation process. Our commercial balance has been bad for a long time because our exports are weak, and we are weak because [our small firms] don’t have the proper size to do that.”

Mr Griveaux, who was one of the founding members of the President’s political party En Marche, was in the UK to meet companies and persuade them that France’s unfriendly business environment is changing.

The labour market reforms aim to make it easier for companies to fire workers, which should also embolden employers to take on workers in the first place, reducing the country’s painfully high 9.8pc rate of unemployment.

Previous administrations have struggled to make serious reforms, typically facing substantial opposition from trade unions.

Mr Griveaux dismissed the strikes as having a “low participation” level Credit: LOIC VENANCE/AFP

Mr Macron wants to push ahead with labour reforms quickly, counting on his election victory and parliamentary majority to help carry the programme through, though he has also spent the summer negotiation with unions in an effort to avoid any clash.

Talking about recent strikes and the extent of demonstrations, Mr Griveaux said: “The unions saw 100,000 people and the police saw only 20,000, so it was something in between. But there was a low participation to be honest,” adding that only one of the three main unions joined the strike.

“Why? Because there was a real round of negotiation, a strong discussion about all kinds of issues. And because I think we have political legitimacy by the vote last May, and it is easier when you have this political drive and political dynamic to implement reforms fast after the election.”

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What goes on if Angela Merkel loses the German elections?

She’s a 15-20 point lead within the polls. She’s an increasing economy, falling unemployment, and private approval ratings which are way from the charts, while her opponents are hopelessly split. There are many things the financial markets are fretting about at this time. But Angela Merkel losing power in Germany the following month isn’t one of them.

But hang on. Merkel has blown big leads previously, she’s fighting an offer so complacent it makes Theresa May’s seem like a whirlwind of charisma and and, possibly most significantly of, there’s a worldwide backlash against establishment political leaders.

What can happen if she lost, or only limped back to power having a fragile coalition? There will be a sharp sell-off in European equities, a chaotic government in Berlin, along with a more quickly integrationist EU as France’s Emmanuel Macron grew to become the Continent’s dominant political leader. It might produce a huge shock, and also the ripples could be felt everywhere.

There are hardly any safe bets available, however the re-election of Angela Merkel as Chancellor of Germany for any 4th term once the country would go to the polls on Sept 24 looks to become included in this.

Angela Merkel is presently having a strong lead within the polls – but has blown big leads previously Credit: Fabrizio Bensch / Reuters

At Paddy Power, she’s 1-14 onto keep power, while her primary rival the Social Democrat leader Martin Schulz is really a 7-1 shot, and subsequently nearest contender, the splendidly named Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, the previous defence minister who may lead the center right CDU-CSU if Merkel happened, is on 50-1. You will get better odds on Wayne Rooney to be the top scorer within the Premiership this year, however that doesn’t appear terribly likely either.

Right now, Merkel includes a commanding lead within the polls. The most recent average sample place the center-Right CDU/CSU on 39pc, the SPD on 24pc, using the far-Left Die Linke on 9pc, the professional-business Free Democrats on 8pc, the Vegetables on 8pc, and also the anti-euro Alternative for Deutschland on 7pc.

Under Germany’s system of proportional representation, all six parties could be symbolized in Parliament, but Merkel is going to be undoubtedly the dominant pressure. Really the only excitement is going to be what type of coalition she forms.

But, the main one factor we’ve surely learnt previously year isn’t to consider any election as a given. Once the experts say something is really a done deal, it frequently pays to accept other part from the trade. You will find signs that the upset might be around the cards.

France’s president Emmanuel Macron would emerge as Europe’s power broker should Angela Merkel lose the election

In her first campaign as party leader, in 2005, Merkel were able to blow a lead in excess of 15 points within the polls, that is how she wound up inside a coalition using the Social Democrats. She isn’t an all natural campaigner, with simmering discontent over her refugee policy.

Even though she’s personally popular, around the issues Spanish people worry about she isn’t particularly in tune using their views. The polling shows Spanish people are mainly concerned about social inequality and fighting poverty, problems that play more naturally in to the hands from the Left.

The economy is searching OK, with lots of jobs. But more and more, which is frequently overlooked, the German economy looks worryingly like ours. There’s plenty of work, but none of them of it’s very well compensated, and the majority of the jobs are likely to workers coming from Eastern Europe (within the last 3 years, Germany has produced 2 million new jobs, only 400,000 go towards the local unemployed, as the other 1.six million go to new immigrants).

As you may know within this country, that model looks good, and somewhat works very well, however it creates lots of resentments which could all of a sudden bubble towards the surface in unpredicted ways.

Electorates have demonstrated themselves ready for radical change, even when there’s no pattern to what they need

From Brexit to Trump towards the destruction from the French old guard by Macron, electorates have demonstrated themselves ready for radical change, even when there’s no very consistent pattern to what they need rather. And bear in mind that both in 2005 and 2013, the left (the SPD, Die Linke and also the Vegetables) were not far from a big part in parliament, and Merkel only found power because she was alone who could assemble a governing coalition.

It’s still an unpredictable mix. The Left Party could collapse, developing a surge for that SPD. The AfD could eat into Merkel’s support. So is the Free Democrats. With PR, and thus many parties within the mix, there’s plenty to experience for.

The impact of Merkel losing could be huge – and incredibly unpredictable. But you will find three big ways it might immediately change up the markets. First, expect an abrupt reversal in equities. During the last six several weeks, Europe is just about the top place to go for global money managers.

With removing political risk and the specter of a chaotic break-from the currency receding, cash continues to be flooding into undervalued, overlooked European markets. Italia, probably the most unhappy market on the planet, continues to be leading that revival but France, The country and, obviously, Germany have been surging upwards too. Out of the blue, however, political risk could be back up for grabs. And lots of that cash would all of a sudden start coming back home again. The markets would get slammed.

Profile Angela Merkel

Next, Germany could be looking for a chaotic duration of instability. Merkel’s most powerful card is the fact that she will lead a reliable coalition. It’s unlikely any rival might be as secure in power. Probably the most likely alternative would be that the SPD’s Schulz leads a Red-Red-Eco-friendly coalition or perhaps a slightly implausible SPD-Eco-friendly-Free Democrat pact (the so-known as Traffic Light option, because its colours could be red, eco-friendly and orange).

Or perhaps a terminally weakened Merkel might cede leadership of the grand coalition to Schulz, in order to an adversary within her very own party. Whatever happened, it might be far, far less strong that Merkel’s existing government, having a non-existent mandate, along with a fragile grip on power. Very little would have completed.

Finally, France’s President Macron would emerge because the dominant estimate Europe. Having a personal mandate along with a huge majority, he’d tower above whomever was Chancellor in Berlin. Italia wouldn’t be a challenger, and nor would The country, and also the British are, obviously, on its way out.

He’d replace Merkel because the power-broker within the EU. His agenda? A radical push for rapid integration, with common tax policies along with a spending ministry for that eurozone, in addition to a tough stance over Brexit. Whether any one of that will jobs are debatable, to say the least, but it’s what can happen.

True, none of this is particularly likely. Probably the most plausible result’s that by late September, a soporific Merkel is going to be securely installed back as Chancellor, heading a coalition dedicated to kicking every can possible lower the street, and staying away from any hard decisions as lengthy as she will.

However the past 12 several weeks have proven no election could be overlooked – as well as that one isn’t an exception. The markets frequently witness a September shock, and when one arrives this season, its likely to become an electoral upset in Germany.

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